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Showing posts from July, 2014

Book Review: The Other Typist

Author: Suzanne Rindell Published: 2014 Publisher: Penguin Books Number of Pages: 354 My Rating: 3
Summary from GoodReads.com:        New York City, 1924: the height of Prohibition and the whole city swims in bathtub gin. Rose Baker is an orphaned young woman working for her bread as a typist in a police precinct on the lower East Side. Every day Rose transcribes the confessions of the gangsters and murderers that pass through the precinct. While she may disapprove of the details, she prides herself on typing up the goriest of crimes without batting an eyelid.        But when the captivating Odalie begins work at the precinct Rose finds herself falling under the new typist's spell. As do her bosses, the buttoned up Lieutenant Detective and the fatherly Sergeant. As the two girls' friendship blossoms and they flit between the sparkling underworld of speakeasies by night, and their work at the precinct by day, it is not long before Rose's fascination for her new colleague turns to …

Book Review: Charms for the Easy Life

Author: Kaye Gibbons Published: 2005 (Originally 1993) Publisher: Harper Perennial Number of Pages: 272 My Rating: 3
Summary from GoodReads.com: A family without men, the Birches live gloriously offbeat lives in the lush, green backwoods of North Carolina. Radiant, headstrong Sophia and her shy, brilliant daughter, Margaret, possess powerful charms to ward off loneliness, despair, and the human misery that often beats a path to their door. And they are protected by the eccentric wisdom and muscular love of the remarkable matriarch Charlie Kate, a solid, uncompromising, self-taught healer who treats everything from boils to broken bones to broken hearts. Sophia, Margaret, and Charlie Kate find strength in a time when women almost always depended on men, and their bond deepens as each one experiences love and loss during World War II. Charms for the Easy Life is a passionate, luminous, and exhilarating story about embracing what life has to offer ... even if it means finding it in unconventio…

Mysteries

Book Review: Gone Girl

Author: Gillian Flynn Published: 2014 Publisher: Broadway Books Number of Pages: 422 My Rating: 5

Summary from GoodReads.com: On a warm summer morning in North Carthage, Missouri, it is Nick and Amy Dunne’s fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick’s clever and beautiful wife disappears. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn’t doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams about the slope and shape of his wife’s head, but passages from Amy's diary reveal the alpha-girl perfectionist could have put anyone dangerously on edge. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media—as well as Amy’s fiercely doting parents—the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he’s definitely bitter—but is he really a killer? 



What can I say about this book that hasn’t already been said? Gillian Flynn is an amazing writer and WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL OF MY LIFE?! Gone Girl caught…

Book Review: What Happens to Men When They Move to Manhattan?

Author: Jill Knapp Published: 2014 (Originally 2013) Publisher: Harper Impulse/Harper Collins Number of Pages: 236 My Rating: 4
Summary from GoodReads.com: The question that 23-year old Amalia Hastings wants the answer to is: What happens to men when they move to Manhattan? Life in the big city gives Amalia a ride she is not expecting. As she tries to find her way on the little island that never sleeps, she discovers she has a harder time navigating through life then she does the streets of Greenwich Village and finds herself truly lost in the complex world of men, graduate school, money, family, and friendship. She thought she had everything she wanted – a new apartment in Manhattan, a first-rate education at NYU, a group of trusted friends and Nicholas, a boyfriend who she once believed was her soul-mate. But somehow, it isn’t enough. Stumbling through her relationships, Amalia encounters Michael. An attractive classmate who quickly moves from being one of her close friends, to an incons…

Book Review: The Bell Jar

Author: Sylvia Plath Published: 1963 Publisher: Harper Perennial Modern Classics Number of Pages: 288 My Rating: 2

Summary from GoodReads.com: Sylvia Plath's shocking, realistic, and intensely emotional novel about a woman falling into the grip of insanity.
Esther Greenwood is brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under—maybe for the last time. In her acclaimed and enduring masterwork, Sylvia Plath brilliantly draws the reader into Esther's breakdown with such intensity that her insanity becomes palpably real, even rational—as accessible an experience as going to the movies. A deep penetration into the darkest and most harrowing corners of the human psyche, The Bell Jar is an extraordinary accomplishment and a haunting American classic.




I recognize Sylvia Plath was an excellent writer and the book itself was written well. However, my review is solely based upon how much I enjoyed reading the book... and I didn't enjoy reading it at all. 
While …

Book Review: Tuesdays With Morrie

Author: Mitch Albom Published: 2000 Publisher: Warner Number of Pages: 194 My Rating: 5

Summary from GoodReads.com: Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher or a colleague. Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and searching, and gave you sound advice to help you make your way through it. For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly 20 years ago. Maybe, like Mitch, you lost track of this mentor as you made your way, and the insights faded. Wouldn't you like to see that person again, ask the bigger questions that still haunt you? Mitch Albom had that second chance. He rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man's life. Knowing he was dying of ALS - or motor neurone disease - Morrie visited Mitch in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final class: lessons in how to live. This is a chronicle of their time together, through which Mi…

Book Review: The Hiding Place

Author: Corrie ten Boom Published: 1984 (Original 1971) Publisher: Bantam Number of Pages: 241 My Rating: 5
Summary from GoodReads.com: At one time Corrie ten Boom would have laughed at the Idea that there would ever be a story to tell. For the first fifty years of her life nothing at all out of the ordinary had ever happened to her. She was an old-maid watchmaker living contentedly with her spinster sister and their elderly father in the tiny Dutch house over their shop. Their uneventful days, as regulated as their own watches, revolved around their abiding love for one another. However, with the Nazi invasion and occupation of Holland, a story did ensue.
Corrie ten Boom and her family became leaders in the Dutch Underground, hiding Jewish people in their home in a specially built room and aiding their escape from the Nazis. For their help, all but Corrie found death in a concentration camp. The Hiding Place is their story.






Let me start off by saying that I have read many, many Holocaust me…